Mar 182013
 
The Arch

The Dive :

The Cirkewwa Arch is actually a cavern which has long since collapsed leaving this spectacular arch as a result. The arch stands just before the drop-off in a depth of 18 meters rising all the way up to 6 meter below the surface. Divers often start at the protective reef nearby which is full of algae and posidonia. Pelagic species such as Skipjacks, Amberjacks and Barracudas are often encountered patrolling the reef in search of their next prey. Continue reading »

Mar 182013
 
01_Karwela

The Dive:
Ideally dived from a boat but can also be dived from the shore. A shot line should be deployed if diving from a boat. Access from the shore is the same as for the Comino Land because the two wrecks are found in the same area about 100 metres apart. It is recommended that one snorkels for about 10 metres then the descent is made and the diver should swim out for about 60 metres to encounter the wreck.  Continue reading »

Mar 182013
 
mvxlendi

Wreck History: 
The vessel was bought by Gozo Channel in February 1990 for Lm327,000. The Xlendi was meant to serve as a cargo carrier between Malta and Gozo, augmenting the service provided by the MV Ghawdex (the latter is currently out of service as well). MV Xlendi was handed over to the Gozo Tourism Association to scuttle as an attraction for divers, after it had stopped operating in 1997. After a lengthy process to obtain a permit to sink her off Xatt L-Ahmar, on the 12th November 1999 MV Xlendi finally hit the seabed resting in a position which due to prevailing winds at the time of scuttling pushed the vessel off the selected and the desired position. Continue reading »

Mar 182013
 
Comino Land Gozo

The Dive:
If diving from a boat, boat can anchor on top of the wreck and a shot line deployed. Access from the shore is by walking across a flat stretch of rocks and entry into the water is by performing a giant stride entry. Ideally you snorkel for about 10 metres then make your descent and swim out for approximately 50 metres until you see the wreck. The wreck can be penetrated in a safe manner as it has various openings. The wreck is lying on a sandy bottom so there is nothing interesting to see around the wreck. Although close to the shore it is not very interesting you may encounter shoals of bream. Watch your bottom time because of the depth as decompression time is easily accumulated.   Continue reading »

Mar 182013
 
Ahrax Point

Ahrax Point is at the extreme northeast of Malta and the dive site is north of the Adventure Campsite. There are surface caves with tunnels inside and entry is via a narrow inlet, varying from three to ten metres in depth. After a ten-minute snorkel, you can choose between a reef full of marine life and the underwater entrance to a large cave. There are cardinal and other fish, brightly coloured corals, red sponges etc. This is best visited through one of the diving centres or accompanied by someone with previous experience. The maximum dive depth is 25 metres.

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Mar 182013
 
Ta' Cenc Gozo

It allows for safe boat anchorage and is a perfect location to do a safety decompression stop, since this is a deep dive around the wall of the reef platform. Nudibranchs and lobsters can be encountered in between the boulders which dot the area. Shoals of damselfish, small groups of bream, a few grouper, lobster and parrotfish will be seen here. The walls are covered with algae, bristle worms, sea urchins and lots of starfish.

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Mar 052013
 
hmsmaori2

Wreck History: 

Malta’s most famous and historical wreck, this World War II destroyer was launched in 1937 and saw considerable action in her life, including valuable assistance with the defence of Malta. However, in 1942 she received a direct hit as a bomb exploded in her engine room whilst in the docks.

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Sep 152012
 
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Wreck History:
The Beaufighter was introduced into Coastal Command as a strike fighter, where its gun armament was retained but rockets and torpedoes were added giving it an even greater fire power. The 5562 Beaufighters that were produced earned a considerable reputation in the Middle and Far East. After its withdrawal from operational use many Beaufighters were converted to target tug duties and in fact the last flight of the type in Royal Air Force service took place on 17 May 1960 when a TT10 made a final target towing flight from Seletar

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Sep 152012
 
blenheim_bomber_engine_big

Wreck History:
Throughout World War II, Allied resources and manpower were always at a premium. At one point a squadron of Wellington Bombers were stationed in Malta, but their long range was much needed elsewhere. They were eventually replaced by much small 3 man Mark IV Blenheim. Although there remains no doubt that it is indeed a Blenheim, this aircraft’s specific identity and call sign are yet to be established. Continue reading »